i am hopelessly addicted to these things.

Romanian parliament approves new government

(AP)  BUCHAREST, Romania — Romania’s Parliament approved a new government led by a former spy chief on Thursday, and he promised to keep up the austerity measures the country imposed to win international loans but to raise public-sector salaries as soon as he can.

"An era of prosperity will not begin tomorrow," said Prime Minister Mihai Razvan Ungureanu, who is known for his pro-American outlook and close ties with President Traian Basescu.

The change of government became necessary Monday, when Emil Boc, who had served as Romania’s prime minister since 2008, suddenly resigned following weeks of widespread protests over the austerity measures and declining living standards.

The nation’s ruling coalition hopes its popularity will be improved by Ungureanu and his new Cabinet before parliamentary elections later this year.

But that may not be easy.

Lawmakers voted 237-2 to approve Ungureanu and his Cabinet on Thursday, but the opposition boycotted the vote, and later said it would contest the new government at the Constitutional Court, citing flaws in the validation process of ministers.

The new government was swiftly sworn in before Basescu, who said the Cabinet, with many young ministers, sends a strong signal that it’s time for the younger generation to change politics.

"I believe the time of your generation has come. The most important thing for Romania is that you, the young ones, succeed," Basescu said.

Basescu said he expects more transparency and reforms from the new government. He also praised Boc’s former one, saying its hard work and unpopular measures have stabilized Romania’s economy.

After his government was approved, Ungureanu, 43, said: “I am serious, hardworking. I go to work at six in the morning and leave when the work is done.” He called work “the most beautiful form of patriotism.”

Ungureanu resigned as head of Romania’s foreign intelligence service on Wednesday evening after he was appointed prime minister-designate.

"An era of prosperity will not begin tomorrow," Ungureanu cautioned, pledging to respect Romania’s agreements with the International Monetary Fund, the European Union and the World Bank.

"I am not coming in these hard times with unrealistic promises," he said, but added that the government may consider “prudent salary increases” in the public sector, if the economic situation allows it. He said his programs will be based on “prudence and responsibility.”

Romanians took to the streets last month amid widespread anger about cuts that Boc’s government had instituted to get a euro20 billion ($26 billion) loan in 2009 from the IMF, the EU and the World Bank. The government needed the money to help pay salaries and pensions after its economy shrank more than 7 percent during the global credit crunch. The sales tax remains at 24 percent, one of the highest levels in the EU, and the government is still cutting public-sector jobs to reduce spending.

There is a widespread perception that the previous government did not care about the hardships that many Romanians face. Polls have shown the governing Democratic Liberal Party with about 20 percent support, compared with 50 percent for the opposition alliance of Social Democrats and Liberals.

Romania is expected to hold parliamentary elections in November.

Victor Ponta, leader of the Social Democracy Party, said that while a change of government is beneficial for Romania, citizens expect real change, not just new faces. He added that he has doubts about the competence of some of the ministers.

Ungureanu’s Cabinet has seven ministers from the previous Cabinet, but new, younger ones for the key portfolios of economy, finance, interior ministry and agriculture. Critics have claimed that the newly appointed ministers, largely unknown to the public, may act as puppets of former ministers.

Some Romanians also are wary about Ungureanu because of his career as a spy chief in a country with seven intelligence services and no foreign enemies.

by cbsnews.com

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by Flickr / ze_valdi

picturesoftheday:

A woman looks out a bus in Bucharest on February 2, 2012. Frigid temperatures have gripped Europe  in the last week, with the mercury reaching as low as 35 degrees Celsius  below zero.  After what had been a relatively mild winter, the sudden  cold caught many unprepared.  Eastern Europe is hardest hit, with over  100 deaths in Ukraine, and with over 11,000 people in remote villages  cut off by snow in Serbia.  Most of the fatalities recorded have been  homeless people found frozen to death outside, and emergency tents with  hot meals have been set up to help them in several affected countries.   Russia and Poland are mobilizing help for the homeless.  Travel in  Romania has been chaos as a blizzard hampered efforts to clear both  rails and roads.  Recorded temperatures in Italy were the lowest in 27  years.

picturesoftheday:

A woman looks out a bus in Bucharest on February 2, 2012. Frigid temperatures have gripped Europe in the last week, with the mercury reaching as low as 35 degrees Celsius below zero. After what had been a relatively mild winter, the sudden cold caught many unprepared. Eastern Europe is hardest hit, with over 100 deaths in Ukraine, and with over 11,000 people in remote villages cut off by snow in Serbia. Most of the fatalities recorded have been homeless people found frozen to death outside, and emergency tents with hot meals have been set up to help them in several affected countries. Russia and Poland are mobilizing help for the homeless. Travel in Romania has been chaos as a blizzard hampered efforts to clear both rails and roads. Recorded temperatures in Italy were the lowest in 27 years.

by Boston.com

Google celebrates 160 years since the birth of Ion Luca Caragiale

Google search engine’s image for January 30 is the portrait of Romanian playwright Ion Luca Caragiale, who was born 160 years ago.

Caragiale, born January 30, 1852, in Haimanale, Prahova County, nowadays IL Caragiale, Dambovita County, was a Romanian playwright, novelist, poet, writer, theater manager, political commentator and journalist, of Greek origin. He is believed to be one of the most important Romanian playwrights and writers. He was chosen member of the Romanian Academy post mortem. He died in Berlin on June 9, 1912.

Caragiale’s work was recognized during his lifetime but he was also criticized. After his death, the importance of his plays to Romanian theater began to gain the recognition it deserved. His plays were staged successfully during communism.

Although he wrote only nine plays (eight comedies and a drama), he is considered the best Romanian playwright for capturing the best the realities, language and behavior of Romanians. His work had a great influence on other playwrights, including Eugene Ionesco.

His work also includes short stories, sketches, parodies, poems and others. He was the founder of comedy theater in Romania.

Caragiale was also head of the National Theater in Bucharest. But as he did not benefit from the support of some of the most important theater actors of the moment and being sabotaged by some Bucharest newspapers, Caragiale had to resign the position in 1889.

by bucharestherald.ro

Boc doesn’t know how Romania passed ACTA. The accord worries an entire world!

PM Emil Boc said on Saturday that for the time being he holds no information as to how Romania passed the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA).

At the end of the Interior Ministry winter command office, Boc as asked by a journalist to comment in relation to the “heated debates” about how Romania passed ACTA. “There are accusations that the government negotiated and approved this treaty without public debates,” the journalist said.

“I don’t have the necessary data to be able to give you an answer, I don’t have such information,” the prime minister replied.

On Thursday, 22 EU member states including Romania signed the treaty. The document had been previously signed by Great Britain, US, Australia, Canada, Japan, Morocco, New Zealand, Singapore and South Korea.

EP rapporteur resigns

Negotiations over a controversial anti-piracy agreement have been described as a “masquerade” by a key Euro MP. Kader Arif, the European Parliament’s rapporteur for the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement resigned over the issue on Friday, BBC News said.

He said he had witnessed “never-before-seen maneuvers” by officials preparing the treaty. Arif criticized the efforts to push forward with the measures ahead of those discussions taking place.

"I condemn the whole process which led to the signature of this agreement: no consultation of the civil society, lack of transparency since the beginning of negotiations, repeated delays of the signature of the text without any explanation given, reject of Parliament’s recommendations as given in several resolutions of our assembly."

ACTA leaves room for abuse

Media communication specialist Dragos Stanca told Realitatea TV that the ACTA treaty contains a lot of positive things but also leaves room for abuse from the authorities, especially in states with less consolidated democracies. Romanians must get the correct information about ACTA, Stanca said.

“The part that refers to online communication and internet in general is extremely controversial,” he said. “For instance, it gives the right to check whether everything on a computer or a mobile phone has a license. This is not a bad thing. But by using this pretext, the authorities can access my phone or computer without requiring a warrant,” the media communication expert said.

by bucharestherald.ro

mellyfronczak:

Brasov, Romania <3

mellyfronczak:

Brasov, Romania <3

by melllvyn

sand-salt-ocean:

I go here every summer &lt;3

sand-salt-ocean:

I go here every summer <3

by vani-ll-a

girlsandrevolts:

An anti-government protester holds a banner that reads ‘I love democracy’ 	      while posing in front of a group of riot police in combat gear in Bucharest, 	      Romania, early Saturday, Jan. 21, 2012. Police on Sunday clashed with a small 	      contingent of around 1,000 protesters in the capital, after demonstrations 	      against austerity measures turned violent. (Vadim Ghirda)

girlsandrevolts:

An anti-government protester holds a banner that reads ‘I love democracy’ while posing in front of a group of riot police in combat gear in Bucharest, Romania, early Saturday, Jan. 21, 2012. Police on Sunday clashed with a small contingent of around 1,000 protesters in the capital, after demonstrations against austerity measures turned violent. (Vadim Ghirda)

by cryptome.org

thespiritcatcher:

Sunset (by Catalin Palosanu)

by Flickr / catalin-palosanu

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